Monday
21.10.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
The Electoral System, the Party System, and Electoral Accountability
Location
B6, 30-32 - Room 310
Date
start: 21.10.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 21.10.2019 - 15:00 Uhr

Speaker:
Christopher Kam - University of Rochester / University of British Columbia
Abstract:
Electoral accountability requires that voters have the capacity to constrain or revoke the incumbent government parties' policy-making power. This capacity, in turn, requires positive relationships between i) changes in the incumbent government parties' votes and changes in their allocation of legislative seats, and between ii) changes in their legislative seats and changes in their share of cabinet portfolios. If either condition fails, the government is unaccountable. We express these two relationships as an “accountability identity” that shows that the electoral accountability of parliamentary governments is an interaction of the electoral system and the party system. Using data from 400 parliamentary elections held in 28 countries between 1948-2012, we estimate the relative contributions of electoral systems and party systems to accountability. Electoral accountability is heavily contingent on the bipolarity of the party system.

Thursday
31.10.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
An Innovative Survey Approach to Gauging the Impact of Racism in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election
Location
(!) A5, 6 - Room B244 (!)
Date
start: 31.10.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 31.10.2019 - 15:15 Uhr

Speaker:
Jon A. Krosnick - Stanford University Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication, Political Science, and (by courtesy) Psychology
Abstract:
With the nomination of the first African-American candidate for President by a major political party, the 2008 U.S Presidential election made history, as did Barack Obama's victory. How much did racism influence the outcome of that election? To answer this question, researchers from Stanford University and the Associated Press designed a national survey to measure citizens racial attitudes and a wide range of other factors that might have influenced turnout and candidate choice. The racism measures included traditional questions asking respondents explicitly to report how they would feel about a black candidate being elected president, and also measuring symbolic racism, racial resentment, and other such constructs. In addition, the survey included an implicit measure of prejudice, called the Affect Misattribution Procedure. Innovative statistical analyses gauged the impact of the many considerations on Americans' decisions about whether to vote and for whom to vote, telling a compelling story about why the election turned out as it did and answering important questions about whether citizens make these decisions wisely. ****************************************************The speaker: Jon A. Krosnick is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication, Political Science, and (by courtesy) Psychology. At Stanford, in addition to his professorships, he directs the Political Psychology Research Group and the Summer Institute in Political Psychology. He is the author of seven books and more than 190 articles and chapters, and conducts research in three primary areas: (1) attitude formation, change, and effects, (2) the psychology of political behavior, and (3) the optimal design of questionnaires used for laboratory experiments and surveys, and survey research methodology more generally. Dr. Krosnick’s scholarship has been recognized by the American Association for Public Opinion Research’s Lifetime Achievement Award, election as a fellow by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Erik Erikson Early Career Award for Excellence and Creativity in the Field of Political Psychology from the International Society of Political Psychology, a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Phillip Brickman Memorial Prize for Research in Social Psychology, and the American Political Science Association’s Best Paper Award. He is the former co-principal investigator of the American National Election Study.

Monday
04.11.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
Dealing with Cabinet Ministers’ Profiles: The 'Open Typology' Strategy
Location
B6, 30-32 - Room 310
Date
start: 04.11.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 04.11.2019 - 15:00 Uhr

Speaker:
Marcelo Camerlo - Universidade de Lisboa
Abstract:
The extensive literature on minister profiles presents the following peculiarity which has encouraged ambitious initiatives of data collection and the available information is nowadays impressive for a great deal of political systems. However, theoretical arguments have been mostly framed around dichotomous constructs, such as politicians versus non-politicians or experts vs amateurs. While the tension between copious information and restricted typologies is evidencing some kind of inconsistency (either too much data and/or too poor conceptualizations), the low level of communication among definitional strategies has encouraged the proliferation of overlapping labels and operational criteria, restraining knowledge accumulation and comparability. This paper proposes a flexible and open typology of ministers’ profiles. By integrating preceding achievements into a systematic framework, the typology addresses shortcomings such as the inconsistency between copious but dispersed data and parsimonious but rigid categorizations. Relying on the set theory approach, criteria and tools for cooperative data gathering and data analysis are provided.

Monday
18.11.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
tba
Location
B6, 30-32 - Room 310
Date
start: 18.11.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 18.11.2019 - 15:00 Uhr

Speaker:
Joseph Gomes - University of Louvain
Abstract:
tba

Monday
02.12.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
tba
Location
B6, 30-32 - Room 310
Date
start: 02.12.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 02.12.2019 - 15:00 Uhr

Speaker:
Regina Weber - Rhine-Waal University
Abstract:
tba

Monday
16.12.2019
14:00 Uhr
Seminar SeriesPublic
tba
Location
B6, 30-32 - Room 310
Date
start: 16.12.2019 - 14:00 Uhr
end: 16.12.2019 - 15:00 Uhr

Speaker:
Laron K. Williams - University of Missouri
Abstract:
tba